Courses Taught

Updated: Monday, August 24, 2015, 7:39 PM

Terry G. Glagowski, Ph.D.

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Introduction to Database Systems (Computer Science 451)

- Introductory course in database systems.

Brief history of data processing systems, rationale for database systems. Introduction to data modeling, E/R, relational, hierarchical, network models. Introduction to query languages, SQL, relational algebra, relational calculus (tuple and domain), integrity constraints, triggers, assertions, referential integrity. Focus on functional dependency, normalization, normal forms, logical design, file systems, indexes, hashing. Introduction to query processing, recovery, concurrency control, transaction processing.
- (30 students lecture - lab, WHETS TV Network)
- (Washington State University, Spring 1995)

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Database Systems (Computer Science 551)

- Graduate course in database systems.

Review of data processing systems and rationale for database systems. Focus on data modeling, E/R, relational, hierarchical, network, object, logic models. Focus on query languages, DATALOG/PROLOG, SQL, relational algebra, relational calculus (tuple and domain), proof of equivalence, safety, closed world assumption. Review of functional dependency, normalization, normal forms, logical design, file systems, indexes, hashing. Focus on concurrency control, transaction management, distributed database management.
- (30 students lecture - lab, WHETS TV Network)
- (Washington State University, Fall 1994-1995)

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Topics in Computer Science: Object Oriented Windows Development (Computer Science 483)

- Microsoft Windows Development using Visual C++, Foundation Classes, Application Framework, OO methods.

Introduction to object oriented analysis, design, programming. Introduction to C++ programming. Introduction to Visual C++ development environment, AppWizard, AppStudio, ClassWizard, Microsoft Foundation Classes, Application Framework: applications, documents, views, main frame window. Graphics Device Interface (GDI), device context (DC), pens, brushes, fonts, mapping modes and scaling. Dialog boxes and controls: check boxes, radio buttons, groups, edit boxes, list boxes, combo boxes, static labels, scroll bars, use of message maps and ClassWizard to establish mapping of controls to input and update handlers. Bitmaps, timers, memory management and the C++ new/delete operators. Menus, keyboard, mouse, accelerators, toolbars, status Bars, Single Document Interface (SDI) vs Multiple Document Interface (MDI). Serialized I/O, printing and preview, Splitter Windows. Context sensitive help and development of Windows Help files .HLP.
- (30 students lecture - lab, WHETS TV Network)
- (Washington State University, Summer 1994)

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Applied Graphics: Microsoft Windows Application Development (Computer Science 443)

- Microsoft Windows Application Development using traditional SDK 3.1 API and C.

Introduction to SDK 3.1 and Microsoft Windows, basic text output, keyboard and mouse input, timer, child window controls, memory management, icons, cursors, bitmaps, strings, menus, accelerators, dialog boxes. GDI, device context, graphics, text and fonts, printer. Clipboard data exchange, dynamic data exchange (DDE), dynamic data linking (DDL).
- (25 students lecture - lab, WHETS TV Network)
- (Washington State University, Summer 1993)

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Software Engineering Laboratory (Computer Science 423)

- Group senior level design project in software engineering.

Simulation of a real-world software engineering task from beginning to end including problem analysis, proposal development, feasibility study, cost/effort estimation, system requirements, design, implementation, testing, and evaluation. Students work in groups and establish an organization, methodology, and schedule for their work. Presentations of results are made by the groups.
- (20 students lecture - lab, WHETS TV Network)
- (Washington State University, Spring 1991-94)

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Software Engineering Principles (Computer Science 422)

- Methodology for the development of software including requirements,

design, implementation, testing, and maintenance. Different software engineering paradigms are discussed including the classical waterfall method, rapid prototyping, and high-productivity environments such as 4GLs. Analysis approaches include methods for real-time systems and information systems using functional, data, and object-oriented views of software systems.
- (40 students lecture - lab, WHETS TV Network)
- (Washington State University, Fall 1990-93)

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Computer Architecture (Electrical Engineering 424)

- Design and development of CPU architecture and microcomputer

systems. Topics include logic design, requirements specification, CPU architecture design, simulation, performance analysis, instruction set specification, microcoded controller design, microcode design, translation, simulation.
- (20 students lecture - lab)
- (Washington State University, Spring/Fall 1990)

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Microcomputer Systems (Electrical Engineering 314)

- Design and assembly language programming of microcomputer systems.

Based on the Motorola 68000 Educational Computer Board (ECB). Design of memory systems, peripheral interfacing, interrupts, assembly language program development.
- (70 students lecture + lab)
- (Washington State University, Fall 1989, 1991)

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Compiler Structures (Electrical Engineering 16.663)

- Compilation and interpretation techniques for computer languages.

Discussion of language types, syntax specification, translation, run-time models, resource allocation, code generation, optimization. Study of several approaches and algorithms for the compilation and interpretation process.
- (30 students lecture)
- (University of Massachusetts, Lowell, Spring 1989)

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Digital Subsystems (Electrical Engineering 16.574)

- Modeling and design of combinational and sequential digital systems.

Discussion of finite state and other automata requirements models, hazards and races, transmission line effects on busses, specific SSI/MSI/LSI chips used as in design examples.
- (30 students lecture)
- (University of Massachusetts, Lowell, Fall 1987)

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Programming Languages (Electrical Engineering 16.524)

- The syntax, semantics, translation, and history of several programming languages including:

BASIC, FORTRAN, C, PASCAL, ALGOL, MODULA-2, PL/1, COBOL, SNOBOL, LISP, PROLOG, FORTH, SMALLTALK, APL, ADA.
- (20 students lecture + lab)
- (University of Massachusetts, Lowell, Spring 1986-Summer 1987)

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Logic Design

- The specification and design of combinational and sequential digital machines.

Topics included boolean algebra, minimization, state-assignment and minimization, technology families, commercially available circuit components.
- (80 students in 2 sections lecture only)
- (Univ. Puerto Rico, Fall 1980).

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Microcomputers

- Programming and interfacing with microcomputers.

Topics included microcomputer architecture, I/O subsystems, software architecture, instruction sets, development tools, laboratory problems. Rockwell AIM-65 and Commodore PET (6502 CPU) were used in hands-on mode.
- (20 students lecture + lab)
- (Univ. Puerto Rico, Fall 1980).

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Software Engineering Laboratory (Computer Science 265)

- Senior elective laboratory in software engineering.

Topics included software engineering methods and practices. Hands on experience with the technical and managerial problems of group software development were discussed. A relational-database was designed and built as class project.
- (7 students lecture + lab)
- (U.Conn Fall 1976, Spring 1977).

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Introduction to Computer Science (Computer Science 101)

- Introductory undergraduate course in PL/C programming.

Topics included elementary data types, control structures, data structures, language syntax, and algorithms. PL/C (Cornell PL/1 interpreter for IBM/370) was used for hands-on laboratory.
- (100 students lecture + lab)
- (U.Conn Fall 1976).

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PL/1 Programming

- In hours course for technical staff members.

Topics included intermediate and advanced techniques for programming in PL/1 including advanced file-manipulation.
- (35 students lecture + lab)
- (Bell Labs. Fall 1970).

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360 Assembly Language Programming

- In hours course for technical staff members.

Topics included intermediate and advanced techniques for programming in 360 assembly language including supervisor service and data management macro instructions, advanced file manipulation, macro definition, multiple module constructions using the linkage editor.
- (30 students lecture + lab)
- (Bell Labs. Fall 1970).

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